Which fiction title should we read for December?

07Nov10

This poll will close Tuesday November 9, at 11:59 p.m. The winner will be announced on Wednesday. Please vote only once!

NetherlandNetherland. By Joseph O’Neill. 256 pp. Both Times reviewers compared the novel to The Great Gatsby, for its depth and richness and its theme of the American Dream, here in post-9/11 New York, and seen through the prism of a Dutch-English narrator and his bond with a charismatic Trinidadian over their shared passion for cricket.

Joseph O’Neill was born in Cork, Ireland, in 1964, and raised in Mozambique, Iran, Turkey and the Netherlands. He now lives in New York. Netherland, O’Neill’s third novel, was named the winner of the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction and selected by The New York Times as one of the ten best books of 2008. ☞ The New York Times Sunday Book Review by Dwight Garner ☞ The New York Times book review by Michiko Kakutani ☞ Google Books page ☞ Amazon.com page.

A MercyA Mercy. By Toni Morrison. 167 pp. Set in 17th century New York on the farm of a Dutch immigrant, Morrison’s novel gives voice to three women of disparate origin: an African slave, a Native American laborer and the orphan wife of the owner.

Toni Morrison was born in Ohio in 1931. She earned bachelor and master degrees in English literature and pursued an academic career until 2006. She published her first novel in 1970. In 1993 she received the Nobel Prize for literature. The New York Times selected A Mercy, Morrison’s ninth novel, as one of the ten best books of 2008. ☞ The New York Times Sunday Book Review by David Gates ☞ The New York Times book review by Michiko Kakutani ☞ Google Books page ☞ Amazon.com page.

One Good Turn (cover)One Good Turn. By Kate Atkinson. 418 pp. An Edinburgh road-rage incident sets off a string of murders in this deft thriller. This was Atkinson’s second Jackson Brodie detective novel; a fourth installment was published earlier this year.

Kate Atkinson lives in Edinburgh. After failing the oral examination for a doctorate in American Literature in the late ’70s, she worked a series of service jobs, from home help to legal secretary to teacher, before achieving success in 1995 with her first novel, Behind the Scenes at the Museum. ☞ The New York Times review ☞ Google Books page ☞ Amazon.com page.



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